EDUCATIONAL SPOTLIGHT:
"THIRD CONSTRUCTION" by John Cage

Featuring SO PERCUSSION
Josh Quillen, Eric Beach, Jason Treuting and Adam Sliwinski

WATCH THE PERFORMANCE
A DISCUSSION OF THE MUSIC OF JOHN CAGE
INSTRUMENTATION & PART CONSIDERATIONS:
Player 1
Player 2
Player 3
Player 4
REHEARSAL TECHNIQUES:
1: Singing the Parts
2: Visual Cueing
3: Defining Roles
4: Teamwork


peters logoJohn Cage's "Third Construction" is available through CF Peters Publishing.

So Percussion and Vic Firth would like to thank CF Peters Publishing
and the John Cage Trust for their continued support.

about the music (source: Wikipedia)

Construction is the title of several pieces by American composer John Cage, all scored for unorthodox percussion instruments. The pieces were composed in 1939–42 while Cage was working at the Cornish School of the Arts in Seattle, Washington and touring the West Coast with a percussion ensemble he and Lou Harrison had founded. The series comprises three Constructions.

Third Construction
Composed in 1941 and dedicated to Xenia Kashevaroff-Cage, to whom Cage was then married and who played in his percussion orchestra. Third Construction is scored for four percussionists. There are 24 sections of 24 bars each, and the rhythmic structure is rotated between the players: 8, 2, 4, 5, 3, 2 for the fourth, 2, 8, 2, 4, 5, 3 for the first, etc.


Instrumentation:
Player I: North West Indian Rattle (Wooden), 5 Graduated Tin Cans, 3 Graduated Drums (Tom Toms), Claves, Large Chinese Cymbal (Suspended), Maracas, Teponaxtle

Player II: 3 Graduated Drums (Tom Toms), 5 Graduated Tin Cans, Claves, 2 Cowbells, Indo-Chinese Rattle (Wooden, with many separate chambers), Lion's Roar

Player III: 3 Graduated Drums (Tom Toms), Tambourine, 5 Graduated Tin Cans, Quijadas, Claves, Cricket Callers (Split Bamboo), Conch Shell

Player IV: Tin Can with Tacks (Rattle), 5 Graduated Tin Cans, Claves, Maracas, 3 Graduated Drums (Tom Toms), Wooden Ratchet, Bass Drum Roar

 


about the composer

“In the nature of the use of chance operations is the belief that all answers answer all questions.”

In 1952, David Tudor sat down in front of a piano for four minutes and thirty-three seconds and did nothing. The piece 4′33” written by John Cage, is possibly the most famous and important piece in twentieth century avant-garde. 4′33” was a distillation of years of working with found sound, noise, and alternative instruments. In one short piece, Cage broke from the history of classical composition and proposed that the primary act of musical performance was not making music, but listening.

Born in Los Angeles in 1912, Cage studied for a short time at Pamona College, and later at UCLA with classical composer Arthur Schoenberg. There he realized that the music he wanted to make was radically different from the music of his time. “I certainly had no feeling for harmony, and Schoenberg thought that that would make it impossible for me to write music. He said ‘You’ll come to a wall you won’t be able to get through.’ So I said, ‘I’ll beat my head against that wall.’” But it wasn’t long before Cage found that there were others equally interested in making art in ways that broke from the rigid forms of the past. Two of the most important of Cage’s early collaborators were the dancer Merce Cunningham and the painter Robert Rauschenberg.

Together with Cunningham and Rauschenberg at Black Mountain College, Cage began to create sound for performances and to investigate the ways music composed through chance procedures could become something beautiful. Many of Cage’s ideas about what music could be were inspired by Marcel Duchamp, who revolutionized twentieth-century art by presenting everyday, unadulterated objects in museum settings as finished works of art, which were called “found art,” or ready-mades by later scholars. Like Duchamp, Cage found music around him and did not necessarily rely on expressing something from within.

Cage’s first experiments involved altering standard instruments, such as putting plates and screws between a piano’s strings before playing it. As his alterations of traditional instruments became more drastic, he realized that what he needed were entirely new instruments. Pieces such as “Imaginary Landscape No 4″(1951) used twelve radios played at once and depended entirely on the chance broadcasts at the time of the performance for its actual sound. In “Water Music” (1952), he used shells and water to create another piece that was motivated by the desire to reproduce the operations that form the world of sound we find around us each day.

While his interest in chance procedures and found sound continued throughout the sixties, Cage began to focus his attention on the technologies of recording and amplification. One of his better known pieces was “Cartridge Music” (1960), during which he amplified small household objects at a live performance. Taking the notions of chance composition even further, he often consulted the “I Ching,” or Book of Changes, to decide how he would cut up a tape of a recording and put it back together. At the same time, Cage began to focus on writing and published his first book, “Silence” (1961). This marked a shift in his attention toward literature.

In the ’70’s, with inspirations like Thoreau and Joyce, Cage began to take literary texts and transform them into music. “Roratorio, an Irish Circus on Finnegan’s Wake” (1979), was an outline for transforming any work of literature into a work of music. His sense that music was everywhere and could be made from anything brought a dynamic optimism to everything he did. While recognized as one of the most important composers of the century, John Cage’s true legacy extends far beyond the world of contemporary classical music. After him, no one could look at a painting, a book, or a person without wondering how they might sound if you listened closely.

For further study:

John Cage database
Wikipedia entry on John Cage
Wikipedia entry on Construction

 


DON'T MISS OUR VIDEO INTERVIEW AND OTHER
VIDEO PERFORMANCES WITH SO PERCUSSION!

–CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE SO PERCUSSION ARTIST PAGE–

For the latest touring and clinic information,
VISIT SO PERCUSSION ONLINE!
www.sopercussion.com








translate